TAKOBOTO

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JLPT N3
Edit  Amatuka
がほしい
Meaning
N, to want something (desirative)
I want a car.
Edit  Amatuka
Formation
See also
Phrases
くつがほしいのです。
I'd like some shoes.
Edit  #893 Amatuka
「わたしは、つまとこどもがほしいので、いえがひつようなんだよ。」
"I want a wife and children, and so I need a house."
Edit  #4990 Miki
だれかはなしあいてがほしい。
I want someone to talk to.
Edit  #4991 Miki
もういちはいビールがほしいな。
I feel like another beer.
Edit  #4992 Miki
デザートにアイスクリームがほしい。
I want ice cream for dessert.
Edit  #4993 Miki
きみはなにがほしい。
What do you want now?
Edit  #4994 Miki
りょうしゅうしょがほしいのですが。
I would like a receipt, please.
Edit  #4995 Miki
ほしい。
I want (you/it). [romantic nuance]
Edit  #6432 adamstudio
ぼくのしゅくだいをしてほしいですが。
I want you to do my homework.
Edit  #6661 tigert
なにがほしいかいってください。
If you want something please ask for it.
Edit  #6885 赤毛
どんなかばんがほしいですか。
What sort of portfolio do you want?
Edit  #6886 赤毛
わたしがほしいちずはどこにもありませんでした。
The map I wanted was nowhere to be seen.
Edit  #6887 赤毛
わたしはもっとちいさいがほしいです。
The tape recorder I want is a little smaller.
Edit  #6888 赤毛
あたらしいようふくがほしいです。
I want new Western-style clothes.
Edit  #6889 赤毛
Discussion and comments
But how do you express "don't want"? I can say "don't need" with irimasen, and "don't intend to" with tsumori dewa arimasen, but it still seems like there is a better way? Is there no direct opposite to hoshii?
euphoriafish
the negative of hoshii is hoshikunai
 行って欲しくない
I dont want you to go
dc
You can also use hoshi to express your desire for someone else to do something.

私はキムさんがケーキを食べてほしいですが
I want kim to eat cake, but ....

for the most part you can exclude 私は because its implied by the grammar. the person you want to complete the action takes the が particle and the verb takes the てform followed by the 欲しい statement 欲しいです

the final が at the end of the sentence means "but" and is used to soften the tone of the request.
tigert
Formed by a noun or noun phrase + ga hoshii.
(Note that, depending on context, ga may be replaced with the topic / contrast marker ha / wa)

N = noun
Amatuka
Darn. Typo on 'differs'.
Amatuka
Note that it's commonly spelt 〜欲しい, like in ex #4990
mathrick
I believe you can also use 欲しい with the て-form of the verbs:

EX. 写真を撮って欲しいんですが。
I want to have a picture taken.

The difference between 撮って欲しい and 撮りたい is that in the latter, it is I who wishes to take the picture, while in the former, I want someone else to take a picture for me.
sutashu
I read somewhere that you can also add のが欲しい to the end of a verb (not as a conjugation) to make it say, for instance, "I want to have a picture taken." It'd sort of be like "I want the thing of taking a picture." (の making 'to take a picture' a noun clause?)
Saralynne
hoishi is always used in the case of nouns... means when we want some noun.. that could be a book... car... camera.. anything.
where as tai is also a want but it concern with some action or verb u want to do.. example: shigoto o shitai desu.
one more..
example in both the case.... make out the difference
example of hoishi..
watashi wa kuruma ga hoishi desu..
example of tai..
watashi wa kuruma o kaitai desu.

I hope.... u all got this ...........
domo
prachi
I give some examples of JPLT4 to show that this entry is level 4 rather than level 3.
赤毛
Good point Saralynne,

Its important to remember that although some grammar constructions can only be used in combination with a noun, In Japanese turning a verb into a noun is rather simple. こと、の、or just slap a noun right after the dict-form of a verb and you can use it with any construction you want.

Hey prachi,
Hoshi isn`t always used with nouns its also used with verbs to express that you want others do do something for you. して欲しい
tigert